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dryden horace happy the man

Another word for happy: pleased, delighted, content, contented, thrilled | Collins English Thesaurus Feminism. Be fair or foul or rain or shine The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine. [Odes] Happy the man, and happy he alone, he who can call today his own: he who, secure within, can say, Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today. An ode by Horace has been versified by many, with Dryden’s version perhaps the most famous in the English language. He who, secure within, can say, Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call today his own: He who, secure within, can say, Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today. by Imitation of Horace John Dryden 8. Odes, Book 3, Verse 29: Happy the Man Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call today his own: He who, secure within, can say, Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today. John Dryden (1631-1700) English poet, dramatist, critic Imitation of Horace, Book 3, ode 29, l. 65 (1685) Happy the Man. “Happy the Man” is not the only work of translation by Dryden—Homer, Juvenal, Lucretius, Ovid, Persius, Theocritus, and Virgil, in addition to Horace, are some of the major authors Dryden brought into the English. Poem by John Dryden. Public domain. The answer is no, however - Dryden wrote this in imitation of Horace, not a translation. I read this poem the other day and, apart from the general ideas it conveys, I feel it’s especially appropriate in the current situation of coronavirus pandemic lockdown. Married to Naomi. "Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call today his own: He who, secure within, can say, Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today. Marko Duvnjak (1/21/2015 3:12:00 AM) That one thing is the ability to look back at the end of the day with an honest and faithful assertion that that day belonged fully to him. Be fair or foul or rain or shine The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine. “Happy the man, and happy he alone, he who can call today his own: he who, secure within, can say, Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today. The answer is no, however - Dryden wrote this in imitation of Horace, not a translation. Happy the man who, far from business, found The sea girt shore of old Long Island Sound. 1 May] 1700) was an English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who was appointed England's first Poet Laureate in 1668.. Change ), You are commenting using your Facebook account. Owning the day means finding and owning the joy of the day regardless of the trials of fate, which are outside his control. LGBTQ ally. He has decided that there is really only one thing—and one thing alone—which has the power to bring genuine happiness to a person. ( Log Out /  The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. By Cassius Amicus Published April 2, 2013 Horace The entire poem is outstanding as is reproduced in full below, but here is a highlight (Dryden version): “Happy he, Self-centred, who each night can say “Happy the Man” bears the appearance of a simple, aphoristic poem, yet a closer look reveals that Dryden in fact carefully engineers his language to highlight the spirit of confidence, positivity, and forward-mindedness. ... Horace, Bk III, Ode XXIX; Trans. Preface to Translations from Theocritus, Lucretius, and Horace, in Sylvæ: or, The second part of Poetical Miscellanies, published by Mr. Dryden, third edition (London, 1702). Please note that the personal views expressed here (and on my social media sites) are not to be taken as representative of any group or organisation, and I reserve the right to control and edit comments made (although I will always indicate if edited). He has decided that there is really only one thing—and one thing alone—which has the power to bring genuine happiness to a person. Be fair or foul, or rain or shine. Quintus Horatius Flaccus (8 December 65 – 27 November 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace (/ ˈ h ɒr ɪ s /), was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus (also known as Octavian). Not Heaven itself upon the past has power, Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. “Happy the Man” Horace translated from the Latin by John Dryden. Ode 29. But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour. Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call today his own: He who, secure within, can say, Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today. Be fair or foul or rain or shine After William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, he was the greatest playwright.

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